Products / Lumber / Fir, Douglas
Print
Share
Request

for orders, quotes and samples

Request
Print
Share

Fir, Douglas

Douglas Fir is one of the world's best-known and most widely used wood species. In British Columbia, there are two varieties of Douglas Fir: Coastal and Interior. The sapwood is light in colour and of narrow width. The heartwood ranges from yellowish to reddish-brown. Earlywood and latewood have a pronounced difference in colour, the latewood having darker, more sharply defined bands. This colour difference results in a distinctive grain pattern when flat-sawn. The wood has a fine to medium texture, straight grain and is non-porous.

Thicknesses

Subject to availability

4/4
5/4
6/4
7/4
8/4
9/4
10/4
12/4
16/4
20/4
1/2"
3/4"
1"

Distribution

Western North America

Scientific Name

Pseudotsuga menziesii

Specific Gravity: Basic

0.45

Specific Gravity: 12% MC

0.51

Janka Hardness

620

Colour/Appearance

Can vary in colour based upon age and location of tree. Usually a light brown colour with a hint of red and/or yellow, with darker growth rings. In quartersawn pieces, the grain is typically straight and plain. In flatsawn pieces, (typically seen in rotary-sliced veneers), the wood can exhibit wild grain patterns.

Grain/Texture

Grain is generally straight, or slightly wavy. Medium to coarse texture, with moderate natural luster.

Endgrain

Small to medium sized resin canals, infrequent and variable in distribution; solitary or in tangential groups of several; earlywood to latewood transition abrupt, colour contrast high; tracheid diameter medium-large.

Rot Resistance

Douglas-Fir heartwood is rated to be moderately durable in regard to decay, but is susceptible to insect attack.

Workability

Typically machines well, but has a moderate blunting effect on cutters. Accepts stains, glues, and finishes well.

Odor

Has a distinct, resinous odor when being worked.

Allergies/Toxicity

Although severe reactions are quite uncommon, Douglas-Fir has been reported to cause skin irritation, nausea, giddiness, runny nose, along with an increased likelihood of splinters getting infected.

Pricing/Availability

Should be widely available as construction lumber for a modest price. Old growth or reclaimed boards can be much more expensive.

Sustainability

This wood species is not listed in the CITES Appendices, and is reported by the IUCN as being a species of least concern.
Powered by Innovasium